Sunday, December 05, 2010

In Defense of My Recipes

It's not often I get defensive about my work and recipes.  I accept my reviews, good and bad, knowing some people will love my recipes, and others just won't.  There are times, though, like now, when I am irked by a review, and just need to have my say.  This most recent review on amazon has done just that.  Why?  The reference to ed&bv as:
This is not a vegan cookbook for the masses. This is a vegan cookbook for wealthy urban educated foodies who are passionate about cooking.
You bet I'm passionate about cooking.  But, a wealthy urban educated foodie?  Let's see.  While writing my first three books, my husband and I shared (the same) one car for over ten years and with two children while he commuted over an hour each way (on public transit) to work.  I am offended by this, because the assertion is that I am wealthy and have written this book for others of similar means.  As a family, we choose to spend our money on things that are important to us.  One of those things is healthy foods, and yes, quality and organic foods.  This is more important to us than spending money on electronics, gadgets, vacations, and the like.

The review continues:
You will find things such as: artichoke hearts, thai basil, lemongrass, maple syrup, agave nectar, tempeh, arrowroot powder, smoked tofu, pine nuts, etc. These things are used everywhere. ... I'm not sure who these reviewers are (professional vegan chefs?) but for an average guy like me, these recipes seem to be universally time consuming and complicated, consistently using half the things in my kitchen to make. Speaking of which, to work with this book you will require a fully stocked kitchen. No hand blender or high end food processor? Sucks to be you.
Everywhere?  I use smoked tofu in one recipe - and indicate how to make substitutions (I regularly give options in my sidebar notes).  Lemongrass is in maybe one or two recipes, and I don't think I even call for Thai Basil in a recipe.  As for fresh herbs, they usually aren't essential to a dish, but will elevate it.  And maple syrup and agave syrup, well, if you want to bake, it's either that or sugar.  Complicated?  Really, how difficult is it to whip up hummus (that's a whole chapter), or make a soup?  I guess if chopping and prepping veg is time consuming and difficult, the reviewer is right, this book is not for you.  As for a food processor... it is not known to be a high-end piece of kitchen equipment, it's pretty much a standard appliance for anyone that cooks.

I know the positive reviews outweigh the bad.  And I know that's what is important.  But I feel I need to stick up for myself and my own work here, and since this is my blog, that's what I'm going to do.  I am not rich (at least not in financial terms), food is a priority for us.  And my recipes are created for flavor.  If that means buying some fresh herbs and occasionally some lemongrass, I guess it does suck to be you.

You know, it surprises me what people will say online in reviews, and moreover, that anyone is given the platform to be negative.  Here's the thing, when you are thinking about reviewing a book, give a thought to the fact that there is actually a person behind that book.  And, that your perception of them and their lives just might be very different from reality.  I don't consider myself a wealthy foodie.  I might get out to a restaurant once or twice (if I'm lucky) in a year.  I do all of my cooking in my kitchen, adjacent to our living room, with my toddler running around, pulling beans out of the cupboard, and needing a diaper change.  So, I stick up for myself and my work this time round, and ask those of you writing reviews to consider what you say before you hit "publish".

51 comments:

aztextpress said...

Hi Dreena!
I know how hard it is to ignore the bad reviews... why is that our minds so easily forget all of the kind words that have been written and tend to dwell on the negative ones? My husband has written 2 books (and we've published 4 others) and so we too regularly check amazon and other sites for reviews. I liked your suggestion that anyone writing a review needs to remember that there is a real person behind each book with real feelings!
I own "ed&bv" and "Everyday Vegan" and only discovered your blog AFTER reading and enjoying and cooking from your books.
As a 20-year vegetarian I have to say that your books (and your blog) have helped me adopt a more vegan diet (not yet 100%).
I've enjoyed and appreciated EVERY SINGLE recipe of yours that I've tried!
I hope this helps to balance that negative review... let's just assume the reviewer was having a bad day and just needed to take it out on someone (or some book).... :)
Michelle

A Day In The Life... said...

Amen!

xoxox...

Christi said...

Keep your head up Dreena. We love your cookbooks, keep them coming!

Shannon said...

I don't get it. At all. The point of buying cookbooks and reading blogs and such is to become MORE educated in the types of foods you enjoy, or to branch out and learn something new. Your books aren't vegan on the cheap, but full of healthy foods for everyday meals and are NOT snobbish but still well prepared. Pine nuts and lemongrass aren't just for the wealthy, in fact, they can mostly be purchased cheaper at smaller ethnic grocery stores where *gasp* they might not have a brand name on them, but work just as well.

I find that some people see ingredients they didn't grow up with automatically assume exotic and expensive. Some of them are, but some of them are basic peasant staples that have different roots. They might be harder to come by where you live, or you might have to do a bit more shopping to get a better price. It is all about learning and having an open mind when cooking.

Michelle Schwegmann said...

BRAVO, Dreena! These days it seems everyone is a critic, or that it's more cool to be negative than it is to be positive. Well, I love your books, I use them all the time, I'm urban, definitely not wealthy, somewhat educated and a bigass fan of your recipes. If this guy spent as much time in his kitchen as he did writing mean-spirited reviews he might be more apt to see what he is missing.

Bryanna Clark Grogan said...

Good post! I sympathize, Dreena! I, too, have had comments by people who assume that I am of some privileged class, highly educated, with money and time to burn-- when, in fact, we live in a small rented house, own one aging car, shop carefully, both work at part time jobs in addition to our freelance work, writing, photography, etc., live on what is considered a low income these days, etc. We buy our clothes at Value Village, and frequent our local island 'free store' at the recycling center.

I've also been accused of being of being part of the 'white elite' when, in fact, my father was "brown" (Peruvian). People make unfair assumptions and seem to have no compunctions about spouting them as if they were gospel!

I've also been accused, like you, of using weird ingredients and making things complicated, when I, too, suggest as many substitutions as I can think of (I live on an island and often have to substitute!) and use as many shortcuts as I can without sacrificing flavor, etc.. One woman whined ad nauseum that in my "20 Minutes to Dinner" book I should have calculated the shopping time and driving time to the store in my recipe times, accusing me of being misleading!

Some people are too lazy to actually read the recipes, and the extra material about ingredients, shopping tips, etc. A cookbook is more than recipes, after all-- the author usually has alot of information to offer.

And, anyway, a hand blender is pretty darn cheap and easy to store in the tiniest apartment kitchen! Sheesh!

S-Chef said...

Well, disguised this person just says you got style, and hey, there is nothing wrong with that!

Melomeals: Vegan for $3.33 a Day said...

Very good response to this.

deromanticize said...

I have no idea why this reviewer thinks your book is fancy or complicated. I am a grad student living off of loans with limited time, and I have made many recipes out of your book. This reviewer must be a fast food/frozen meal vegan.

Amy said...

Aw, don't let it make you feel bad. I'm certainly not wealthy, and your books are some of my favorites! :) I consider them really pretty straightforward and definitely unpretentious. I think the fact that this person thinks a food processor is high-end equipment and tempeh is exotic (and/or pricey) says a lot. He's probably *really* new to cooking, at all, so some of this stuff is unfamiliar.

Mirkat said...

ISTM that none of the ingredients the reviewer singles out are particularly exotic nor hard to find. Maybe this is someone whose comfort zone doesn't extend much beyond salt, pepper, mustard, and ketchup?

Gail said...

Sounds like the "average guy" who wrote that negative review couldn't find his way around the kitchen any further than his microwave. Seems like he might have had an ulterior motive or else he just needs to find something more constructive to do with his time. (Like broaden his culinary horizons and learn how to cook, perhaps?)

Tam said...

Hi Dreena,
If I could figure how to email I would have preferred to do that rather than post (I am one of your silent regular readers) ... but I saw this and could not let it pass without reaching out. I want to let you know that we are a far from wealthy family, and I find your recipes very accessible. I have learned so much from you through your books (I only have 2 of them so far to be honest - Vive and ED&BV - but am working on that ;) - I love them! ) and your blog.

((((hugs))) - I am sorry someone left such a silly, inane review.

warmest wishes,
Tamar

Kelly said...

Hear, hear! I think you're right to defend your work in this case, because the allegation is just so ridiculous and it feeds into the untrue idea that being vegan is only for the privileged. I actually have a tiny bit of sympathy for feeling a little intimidated (at first) by unfamiliar ingredients, but that's what I LOVED about going vegan - the chance to discover all these amazing food elements that were totally foreign to me in my pre-vegan days! And I was SO surprised to discover that many of these unfamiliar ingredients *were* available at big-box, chain grocery stores - you just have to know where to look and for what you're looking. It's all about keeping an open mind and approaching "intimidating" recipes with an intrepid spirit and a desire to familiarize with new flavors and ways of eating.

Anyway... keep on keepin' on! You're great at what you do and we all appreciate your contributions to the world of yummy vegan food. :)

Kelly said...

Oh, and one more thing - I don't have a hand/immersion blender or a food processor (horrible, I know) and I manage just fine! I just get creative in the kitchen. :)

Lauren M said...

Sounds like the reviewer was simply overwhelmed. Reading and trying new recipes is how I've learned to cook and to be able to experiment with my OWN recipes, which I never thought I'd be able to do! Also, over the years, my kitchen appliances have increased based on the recipes I wanted to make. High end food processor? No way, in fact it's a mini one, but it does the job for a batch of something. Emersion blender? You betcha, but a regular blender works, too and was what I used before. Basically, the guy should use the recipes he likes and skip the others for the time being. Maybe one day he'll feel up to the challenge of trying a food item he hasn't. Also, agave and Maple syrup? They're in my Super Wal-Mart, Giant and Shoppers and obviously all participating in online conversation have the internet which can be a great inexpensive way to order foods you can't find in your area. Dreena, I asked my "secret santa" for your cook books for Christmas and I frequently use your recipes from online. Thanks and great work.

Anonymous said...

Hi Dreena,

Just wanted to say that I may not get a chance to try all of your recipes, but I do love reading your blog and they all sound wonderful. I really appreciate the creativity and effort you put into them.

This really spoke to me:

"Here's the thing, when you are thinking about reviewing a book, give a thought to the fact that there is actually a person behind that book. "

It is SO so easy for people to criticize your "product" as though they are criticizing the french fries at McDonald's or the croissants at Costco. They don't seem to get that someone's time, energy and best efforts went in to creating the thing they're ripping apart. It isn't some junk that a person hidden away in layers of corporate bureaucracy came up with as a way to make a buck.

This has happened to me and I felt crushed afterwards. But I did go back and review the 99.9% of the people who had given me positive, atta-girl messages. So I encourage you to do the same. If you can learn something from the criticism, great. But if you can't, put it behind you and just keep doing you.

Lady Lent said...

I kinda laughed reading that "artichoke hearts, thai basil, lemongrass, maple syrup, agave nectar, tempeh, arrowroot powder, smoked tofu, pine nuts, etc. " were implied to be off the wall or difficult to find... I think every single thing that was listed are commonly found in most vegan cookbooks! Maybe for the run of the mill omnivore, they'd have to take a couple extra minutes searching for ingredients they may have never used before, however this cookbook was made specifically for vegans...Hand blenders are really cheap, so are some food processors, and I agree that they are commonly found in anyone's kitchen that does even a minimal amount of cooking - if you have enough skill in the kitchen to review a cook book, I would imagine you have the basic appliances! Everything about this person's review annoyed me...

vanessa said...

Keep your chin up, Dreena! In situations like this, always like to think of a quote by Dr. Seuss: "Be who you are and say what you feel, because the people who mind don't matter, and the people who matter don't mind."

Also, as a student of holistic nutrition, I constantly recommend your books to people who are looking for quick, easy, cost-effective, healthy yet tasty meals. Your books introduce readers to new foods - quinoa, millet, tempeh, etc. - and creative twists on familiar recipes that appeal to the whole family.

Though I am no longer vegan, I always have and always will love your cookbooks.

Keep up the great work! We *heart* you! ;)

radioactivegan said...

You have written some of the most useful cookbooks I own! I've been living on about 20k for the last 9 years (during college and grad school) and I've never had trouble using any of your recipes. Don't let one poo-pooer be a pain! We all love your work and agree that you are not trying to perpetuate the vegan elite myth. I'm certainly no professional vegan chef, but I know how to buy a jar of artichoke hearts.

Sportsgirl said...

Hi there

I didn't read the review as overly negative at all. To be honest it would make me want to buy your book because it mentions some yummy ingredients that I love to use in cooking!!

Millie said...

Wow- how difficult does he think it is to find agave nectar and use a food processor? Sounds like he doesn't want to expand his culinary horizons and is perhaps a bit lazy.

Lauren said...

Fact: For every one of this kind of review, you have hundreds of people (like me) who absolutely adore your recipes! Fact: I will buy every single cookbook you publish :).

Jessica said...

I'm sorry that your book received that kind of review, because I think quite the opposite of it -- the book gets you away from leaning on processed and pre-packaged ingredients, which are the real expensive vegan food. There is even a guide on cooking dried beans and grains, which can be a big money-saver.

I was just talking up ED&BV the other day, about how I have enjoyed all the recipes I've tried (including during periods when I was un- and underemployed). The cashew-ginger tofu is a definite hit in my home and I just served pumpkin-cheese pie at Thanksgiving.

I also LOVE the clean layout -- it is so easy to scan the ingredients list and the lists are usually quite short, about 10 items or less on most of them. It's a bonus that the recipes are so easy to read. :)

London Mabel said...

I have mixed feelings.

On one hand, my hand blender cost $8 and I bought it at a regular grocery store. I've owned my food processor for about 20 years. And I'm not wealthy either, and I would NEVER have qualified your books in this manner. There ARE vegan cookbooks with long recipes, and I don't buy them because I'm not a "foodie." So I agree with you that the reviewer could have phrased the critique in a less judgmental manner.

On the other hand, when I first decided to start cooking more at home (tired of processed or bland vegan food) it did take me about a year or so to slowly collect all the ingredients I needed to cook this way on a regular basis. A lot of vegan ingredients are expensive, or hard to find at the local grocery store--and that applies to 90% of the cookbooks. But you only need to get your kitchen "up to par" once, and after that it's not that expensive to slowly replace each ingredient as it gets used. So pretty soon it all becomes normal and you don't think about it anymore. --> So from that perspective I think his review is fair enough, though could be applied to most vegan cookbooks.

It just sounds like that extra bit of time/effort/initial-money it requires to make good tasting vegan food isn't something he's ready to commit to yet. And someone in a similar situation might find the review helpful. [Minus, as I said, the judgy bits.]

Anyway, thanks as ever for your lovely books. And since vegan marshmallows are not readily available, I will die indebted to you for Nicer Krispie squares. (Ohhh how he's missing out.)

Carpensm @ A Life without Ice Cream said...

It sucks to get a bad reviewer but this person needs to have a little creativity in the kitchen. I very rarely meet a recipe that I follow verbatim because I don't usually have all the ingredients.

Ryan said...

Well said, Dreena! I think I would have opted for the simpler, but less diplomatic "You're a turd."

Anonymous said...

sounds like this reviewer might live in a small town, or might not have access to a wider variety of ingredients. i do like to see reviews of all kinds when I use online shops as it gives validity to the positive reviews. having all positive reviews always seems a little fishy to me.

Anonymous said...

awww. Sending you a cyber hug! I have gifted ED&BV a gazzilion times BECAUSE, as I tell all my friends "everything in it is stuff you'll already have on hand or you can get at a regular grocery store." Actually, I'm on my way to amazon to add in my review....

Michelle.S said...

I love your recipes because they are usually so adaptable if i am missing an ingredient or want to substitute. My family looks for ways to save money, but not on food, since it has been our medicine. Plant-based, vegan food has given me my health and energy back, and that is priceless. I agree with the comment about getting your kitchen set up, and then a lot of products last such a long time.

As you know, your support and your books have been a huge part of my improved health. Lots of love to you and I think it is time I wrote a review on amazon to counterbalance that one!

Ricki said...

I agree with the commenter above who said that the reviewer must be someone used to a very unhealthy diet--sounds like a fast-food kinda guy to me who's following the SAD diet. And if that kind of person is looking for that kind of diet, no, it's not in your books. Your books offer healthy, delicious, foolproof and creative recipes (all of which I adore). If someone isn't looking for healthy vegan food, I suggest they can find what they want in many other places. But, as another commenter noted, your ingredients are found in pretty much every vegan cookbook. (I can't imagine what he'd think of my diet or the recipes on my blog!!) ;)

Your recipes are always a hit around here--with vegans and omnis alike--and are among my very favorites of all time. And I know you have legions of fans who all feel that way. Your negative review says more about the reviewer than it does about you and your recipes!

Anonymous said...

I am the villified author of the review in question here (one of you linked to this blog in the comments). Out of respect for the author, I have altered the tone of my review, but not the content - I won't be bullied into submission. I wrote the review in a frustrated mood. I had attempted the Thai coconut Stew recipe, found out halfway through it that I needed a hand blender (that I don't have) and the recipe turned out barely edible after spending $40 on groceries and running around half the afternoon to collect the ingredients. I suppose this is my own fault for not reading the recipe carefully enough, but still. I hope that you no longer find it offensive.

I still think this book would be best apprecated by "wealthy urban educated foodies" but I can see how this is also judgemental and possibly unfair, so I removed the statement. I have nothing personal against the author or anyone else - I just wanted to warn others about my experiences with this book, as I feel it is not the book it is advertised to be.

Maybe some of you are so far into veganism that you don't see it anymore, but this book is pretty far "out there" in terms of what "regular" people eat. I realize these are all subjective terms, but I stand by them. If I did not have access to an organic grocery store, I don't know how I would make half these things.

Also, I DID buy this book, and hence am a customer of yours. If I were you, I would rather hear honest criticism than surround myself with people who simply parrot my own thoughts back to me. If you made your recipes more "accessable" you might sell more books.

Alison Cole said...

Hi Dreena - good for you for writing this post, because it gives you a forum in which to rightfully respond to his silly review. All of the ingredients he listed are standard ingredients in my cooking repertoire - and I am not an elite cook! I just like to cook good food! It's the artichokes and the maple syrup and the smoked tofu that make cooking fun, delicious, and nutritious - that's the point of your book. If he didn't want recipes using these kinds of delicious ingredients (which he claims are common), then he can instead use one of thousands or millions of boring recipe books out there. And as for the food processor, in my opinion, it's a must-have appliance for every cook. I always say it's one of the best purchases I ever made. I carefully chose a $70 food processor from The Bay when I was a poor student over a decade ago. It just broke down this summer and so, still being poor, I opted to buy a high end/fancy food processor from Craigslist recently for $25! People like him are just silly and need to be educated on these matters.

Vegan Vixen said...

Hey Cutie Pie. There is no need for me to tell you how wonderful your books are, because, simply put, they just are. And all the previous comments have stated it much more eloquently than I could. Quite simply put the guy is clearly lacking in the 'weiner' department and needs to vent his frustration somewhere. Chin up chick and ignore the 'little fella' ;-) xxx

Alessandra said...

I am sorry that you had to read that. I write books, and I know about reviews. In fact I also write reviews. But if I don't like a book don't review it, my 'precious' opinion could harm someone, and may be not all that 'precious' after all.

Reviewers can be the hell of the publishing world, get back to that person, directly or through your publisher, publicly if you can. Often reviewers don't know anything about the subject anyway.

ciao
A.

Domestic Dharma said...

Dreena,
My husband and I talk often of how easy it seems for folks to be harsh and critical of others when it's a more anonymous forum, such that the internet allows, this is unfortunate.
I would like to express my appreciation for your recipes and cookbooks (ED&BV) in particular. This book has been an overwhelming crowd pleaser when I cook for vegans and nonvegans alike and is the source of many of our all time favorites, hello phyllo rolls!!!. I loved using this book to explore new food flavors when I made my diet and lifestyle change, lemongrass was right at the store I always shop at, I had never really noticed it before, oh baby is it good! The hummus recipe section is worth the purchase alone. Just wanted to let you know, keep doing what you do, we love it in our house! =D Thank you!

Catherine said...

I get a lot of grief from people regarding how much money my boyfriend and I spend on food -- I am shocked that when most people say "good" they really mean "cheap" when it comes to food. I realize the economy's bad, but c'mon! Do you want to pay a little extra for food now, or a lot extra down the road when you have hosts of medical problems? Personally, I'd rather pay now for the food -- plus, food is more fun than hospitals!

Anonymous said...

"Also, I DID buy this book, and hence am a customer of yours. If I were you, I would rather hear honest criticism than surround myself with people who simply parrot my own thoughts back to me. If you made your recipes more "accessable" you might sell more books."

The number one rule of business is to know thy customer. That means that you can't be all things to all people. Dreena's cookbooks are targeted to a certain audience (FYI, I am not a vegan, but I love her desserts. They are easy to make and delicious). I think you have learned the hard, hard lesson of never beginning a recipe before you have read every step and made sure you have all ingredients. Who hasn't done that?

However, if what you want is to slap together some decently edible food based on whatever you have laying around your house, perhaps the Rachel Ray cookbooks might be more up your alley. But I think Dreena's audience prefers her current style.

Also, you can use a regular blender in future to blend soups (just make sure you leave the top ajar slightly or it will create a terrible vacuum of exploding, hot soup).

Babette said...

I bought Eat, Drink and Be Vegan this weekend and I love it. I made the Cocoa Banana Muffins and they were great and low in sugar. I'm cooking the Hide the lentils sauce right now (with French lentils though) and it smells lovely. I love your books because you use a lot of different ingredients others don't use, such as barley and oat flours, and you also mention substitutions in several recipes.

I'm looking forward to your fourth book.

Carolyn said...

Well, Dreena, maybe this was for a good cause. I've been meaning to buy this cookbook for some time and by crikey, this made me do it! I'm glad the reviewer has taken pause to reflect on his review, and he has every right to an opinion. But when I went on over to the link and read the thing what I left with was no sympathy for someone who hasn't read the recipe. Zero. Zilch. Don't care if it cost you $40, you didn't read the g-d recipe first.

If you try a recipe and follow the directions (meaning you use what the recipe calls for) and it turns out like foo-foo, THAT is valuable information. For both the author and prospective buyers.

Glo said...

Dreena, I have never commented before but this post made me want to share with you the profound impact your cookbooks have had on my life.

ED&BV was the first book I bought after becoming a vegan. Yes, most of the ingredients were somewhat foreign to me but following your recipes taught me so much about health, veganism, and cooking in general.

It was your desserts that inspired me to bake. I baked and baked and baked. I surprised family members, co-workers, and friends with delicious cookies and cakes that they couldn't believe were healthy and free of animal products. I have fallen in love with sharing with people that you can enjoy cruelty free food that will also help you live an energizing life and taste great.

Now I plan to get formal culinary training and open my own vegan bakery to share with everyone the joys of this life :)

Dreena said...

Carolyn, I just had to add a quick note that as ironic as it is that you decided to buy my book after reading the review, what I love best about your comment is "by crikey"!! I laughed when I read it, that phrase that needs more usage! :D Thanks for the chuckle!

Anonymous said...

Hi Dreena,
I am Dutch and gave your cooking books as a present to many people (especially vive le vegan, as the chapter on food for your vegan baby and toddlers are immensly helpful)even if there is an entire ocean seperating us, I can tell you that most things here are available. Sadly we do not have jicama's here or earth balance; but still I can make most of your recepies. I am pleased with your books and as a mother of 4 I can say you make vegan healthy cooking a lot more easier, keep up the good work. Kind regards!

bitt said...

I don't consider those ingredients to be hard to find at all. I've seen much more complex. My rule of thumb is that if it's at Whole Foods, the average vegan could probably find it. I get complaints about making recipes that look "too complicated" so yes some recipes are not for the masses. I think taking recipes to a new level is important. Just because it's vegan doesn't mean it has to be boring or simple.

bitt said...

ps: your chocolate chips are THE BEST EVER and won our GF cookie contest.

Anne said...

I actually own a few vegan cookbooks that do exactly what this person accuses you of doing. But, I turn to your cookbook as a break from either the super time consuming or the expensive vegan cookbooks. Your ingredients are easy to find, your food is good and your recipes are easy to follow. That guy's just an asshole.

veganspoonful.com said...

I am comforted to hear that you prioritize food spending even while on a budget, because I do the same thing! Sometimes it is tempting to just buy the 5-pound bag of white sugar at the supermarket rather than unbleached evaporated cane juice, or agave nectar, or maple syrup...but it is important to me to buy the less-processed, more ethical product. We, too, are a one-car family (with three kids!) and my husband either walks or bikes to work, or we give him a ride. Buying organic, local, and unprocessed foods is not always a matter of having more money, it is a matter of prioritizing your spending.

I love your cookbooks, Dreena!

joanna said...

dreena, your books were the first books i read about veganism! i was immediately hooked because the recipes were so easy and i could find the ingredients at the regular grocery store without having to go to some specialty store. after i tried my first recipe of yours, i was thinking "wow, veganism is pretty easy and totally delicious."

Lindsay (Happy Herbivore) said...

This has happened to me as well -- some people, I think, are just looking to find faults. Maybe they're jealous, maybe they're negative people or maybe they are the person who always says "nay" when everyone else yells "yay" to keep things from being uniform.

It's unfair, I agree -- and I think these people forget authors are real people with feelings...

I know its hard, but ignore it. You are amazing. so are your recipes. Tell the haters to suck it!

Ariel Lebert said...

I am just rereading this post and it really ticks me off. I am a 20yr-old college student, definitely not rich. I don't have any problem placing my priorities straight with my money. The cost of buying organic produce and other vegan foods evens out to the amount most people spend on dairy and meat products.. Your cookbooks are wonderful and I use them every day. EVERY day. Thank you.

heguibertp said...

I haven't read your book(s) but your post already convinced me it's a must have. Clearly the person who wrote the review only eats out... which is expensive and can be pretty harmful to your health!
Nice rebuke :)
Cheers,
H